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Monthly Archives: April 2010

Written for my COMM200 class (Spring Semester 2010) in April 2010 for a group project on blogging with a bias. My group’s blog intentionally has left lean, and was graded according to correctly writing with a liberal slant. Original here.

CNN’s ratings are in and it’s not good news. Despite recent months filled with massive news stories like the Haiti earthquake that viewers usually flock to CNN for coverage, viewership is drastically down.

Prominent prime-time hosts have lost almost half their viewers, which raises the question of whether or not their audience is looking for the hard-news hosts CNN offers. And with FOX News’s ratings ahead of the rest, the issue of ideology is now also out on the media table.

Mat Marshall, a freshman at the University of Delaware, says yes, CNN no longer has an edge over the other networks. “CNN’s problem isn’t ideological, it’s the quality of their reporters. Wolf Blitzer and Larry King are boring. Chris Matthews is entertaining.”

CNN’s reaction to this: hire conservative blogger, Erick Erickson. Erickson, writer for Red State, is notorious for writing outrageous things, such as:

Barack Obama could be pillaging poor people in Chicago, shagging every hooker in Washington, D.C., and going to Communist Party meetings with his wife and the media would (A) never look into it and (B) never mention it even if they knew.

Is the addition of such a controversial talking head necessary to CNN? Is this what the viewers want? And, if so, was Erickson really the proper choice? All the negative signs point to “not likely,” and Jon Stewart agrees.

But maybe Jon Stewart himself is part of the solution to CNN’s problems. With the wild success and loyal viewership of his comdey news show, The Daily Show, coupled with the rising ratings of the not-so “fair and balanced” FOX News, news audiences seem to be looking for a bias, a spin, or at least a twist on their news. And in that case, hiring Erickson was a step in the right direction, literally.

Check out NPR’s take on this story.

Source: barackobama.com

Written for my COMM200 class (Spring Semester 2010) in April 2010 for a group project on blogging with a bias. My group’s blog intentionally has left lean, and was graded according to correctly writing with a liberal slant. Original here.

Said on a television show: immediate cancellation by the FCC. Said by the vice president of the United States: marketing opportunity by the Obama administration.

Joe Biden’s nowinfamous description of the passage of the health reform bill has made its way onto a t-shirt, despite the obscene nature of the acronym.

There are things that are a big deal — birthdays, anniversaries, the NCAA Championship game. And then there are things that are a BFD, like delivering health insurance to 32 million Americans.

For $25, now anyone can let the world know that, along with the vice president, they too think “Health Reform is a BFD.”

Written for my COMM200 class (Spring Semester 2010) in April 2010 for a group project on blogging with a bias. My group’s blog intentionally has left lean, and was graded according to correctly writing with a liberal slant. Original here.

The National Republican Congressional Committee began airing ads on Tuesday aimed at the “Flip Flop Five.”

These “Five” refer to the Democrats who changed, or as Republicans are call it, “flip flopped” their votes on the healthcare legislation, first voting against the House bill in the fall, but then supporting the final health care legislation in March. Florida representative Suzanne M. Kosmas is the target of this ad, and other Florida representative Allen Boyd is surely up next to be criticized.

The ad features less than clever lines like “That’s a big flip, she’s a big flop,” and the image of dull gray flip flops worn by a person with yellow, broken nails on veiny feet to personify Kosmas.

This ad not only attacks the representatives, but it also is obvious in it’s opposition of the recently passed healthcare legislation. The National Republican Congressional Committee is using the already notorious phrase “flip flop” from the 2004 presidential race to discourage people from supporting the healthcare bill and encouraging them to not support the current Democrats in Congress who changed their stance on the legislation.

The ad is set to run in the coming days on cable networks in the concerning districts, and ads for the other four “flip flopping” representatives will run next.

Written for my COMM200 class (Spring Semester 2010) in April 2010 for a group project on blogging with a bias. My group’s blog intentionally has left lean, and was graded according to correctly writing with a bias. Original here.

Republicans have been spending large amounts of funds on business expenditures—in the loosest turn of the phrase—the Daily Caller reports.

One of the more shocking bills comes from an L.A. “sex club,” decorated with “pornographic pictures [which] double as wallpaper” and frequented by celebrities.

Despite being considered tame in comparison to other establishments, do republicans really want their leaders to use their money at a topless bar which the Daily Caller says features “women dancers imitating lesbian sex”? Probably not.

Written for my COMM200 class (Spring Semester 2010) in April 2010 for a group project on blogging with a bias. My group’s blog intentionally has left lean, and was graded according to correctly writing with a liberal slant. Original here.

A new Washington Post poll released this week shows that 50 percent of people who responded do not support the healthcare bill, and only 46 percent support support the changes.

This divide in support leaves the future unclear for Democrats in Congress and the security of their seats.

The consensus appears to be that new Democrat seats in the South are the ones most in jeopardy, but traditionally Democrat seats are safe since their voters are more set in support. Right now it might seem that a dramatic shift against Democrats will occur, but this is only caused by healthcare being such a recent issue, and the most opposed are often the most vocal, making them appear like a larger presence.

Check out NPR’s take on this issue, featuring two professors from Emory University.

Written for my COMM100 class (Fall semester 2009) in November 2009, as a film review assignment.

“My name is Charlie Bartlett!” the adolescent protagonist exclaims in the opening scene.

Charlie may fall along the lines of the slightly dorky, eccentric, smartass teenage boy, however the character offers more than the shell of the nerd-cool trend of today. The charming and clever Charlie, played with the perfect balance of wit, articulation and vulnerability by Anton Yelchin, has a mature perspective on life, directly caused by his estranged father’s prison sentence for tax evasion and his mother’s consequent shift from reality, and Charlie’s new responsibility to take care of his mother.

Despite being not-all-there, Marilyn Bartlett, lovably and endearingly portrayed by Hope Davis, raises another point, adding to the list of heavy themes that this deceivingly lighthearted film touches on: “Well, maybe there’s more to high school than being well liked.” “Like what, specifically?” “Nothing comes to mind…”

This oddly insightful realization of high school society in the opening five minutes of the movie sets the tone that this film, by first-time director John Poll, will not just be a “Ferris Bueller” knock-off. Read More

Written for my COMM100 class (Fall semester 2009) in October 2009, as part of a blog entry assignment.

The indie music genre, named for it’s disconnection from the mainstream, is, ironically, filtering into the popular sphere.

Playing lesser known artists in mass audience media is nothing new. In current memory, the teenage soap opera The O.C. perfected the incorporation of low-key, hipster music into their scenes to achieve the extra dramatic effect, while giving the show countless cool points. Read More